The Oxen

The days pass him by with
the heat on his back.
The dirt in his face.
Sweat on his brow. 

He plows on
and on, and on.

With the sun’s faithful glow
and the rain’s nurturing gifts
The Oxen begins to watch his fields grow,
his labor yields a great bounty
as the seasons start to shift.
Much to The Oxen’s dismay,
the farmer takes him away.
To the corral, he goes,
just as he knows.
While the field is harvested and razed.

The grain is now stored in bins as tall as the sky,
The farmers are now fat and happy on bread, beer and rye.
While The Oxen shivers in his frozen stall
he begins to wonder if this is worth it at all.
The Oxen rests on his haystack prize.

The sun has returned, all is now well.
The soil and grass lift his spirit with their uplifting smell.
The Oxen prepares himself to return to work
when reality gives him a conspicuous jerk.
The farmer has sold him to dig trenches and wells.

The Oxen has given all that he can give.
Can one fear death when one hasn’t lived?
Hooven pads collapse in the mud.
Bladed whips lash into his blood.
The Oxen rises. Now a frail, crimson sieve.

The days pass him by
with the heat on his back.
The dirt in his face.
Sweat on his brow. 

He plows on
and on, and on.

Thoughts and Prayers

Thoughts and Prayers,
Thoughts and Prayers.

 

When the world has been torn asunder,
by a gunman, a bomber, or natural blunder,
Do not fret, do not fear.

Relax.

There is one thing that you need to hear.

 

Thoughts and Prayers,
Thoughts and Prayers.

When your children are in the jaws of the wolves,
when your people are hungry and riot in droves,
when your poor die frozen deaths from the cold,

there’s only one thing you can do, I suppose,

Thoughts and Prayers,
Thoughts and Prayers.